Rice University

Participation in the CMS experiment

Paul Padley
Paul Padley
Jabus Roberts
 Jabus Roberts
 Frank Geurts
 Frank Geurts
Karl Ecklund
 Karl Ecklund

Physicists in the Bonner Laboratory of the Department of Physics and Astronomy at Rice University (http://www.physics.rice.edu/nuc.cfm) have been participating in the construction of the CMS experiment since 1994.  Currently, four faculty, one engineer and three post doctoral researchers are working on the experiment. 

 

Rice has played a key role in the development of electronics used in the CMS experiment http://bonner-pc4.rice.edu/cms/. These electronics contribute to the real time data mining of interesting events from the experiment as data is taken.  This work, lead by Prof. Paul Padley and Dr. Mike Matveev (Research Electronics Engineering), has involved a number of graduate and undergraduate students over the years.  Currently Post-Doctoral researcher Laria Redjimi is also contributing to this work. 

 

Prof. J. Roberts has been heavily involved in the installation and commissioning of the endcap muon system.  Working with students and post-docs at Rice, they have tested and installed many parts of this detector.  This work, having been successfully completed, is now shifting to working on taking data with the experiment. 

 

Prof. Frank Geurts has been in charge of online systems for the endcap muon detector.  This involves writing, testing and implementing all of the software used to operate the detector.  He has also been leading the effort to commission the electronics used for data acquisition and selection for this subdetector.

 

The Rice group also plays a similar role in the Pixel system for CMS.  Prof. Karl Ecklund is leading the team developing the control and readout of the pixel detector. Post-Doctoral researcher Vesna Cuplov is working with him on this important task.

 

The Rice group will also play an active role in the analysis of data taken with the experiment.  Of particular interest will be the production of events with two leptons which may reveal new particles or interactions for the first time at the LHC.